Loki and the Doctor

All of the fandoms!!

115,132 notes

connors-nipple:

lady-fett:

please enjoy this video of an action packed, high speed fight between two cats.

(Source: motherof-kittens, via tobetheshield)

9,552 notes

letstalkaboutdisney:

This man has been one of my biggest inspirations since I can remember. Even when I was 4 and barely understood what actors were, I always recognised him and would point at the TV and say ‘there’s the funny man’. They think that his death may have been suicide which makes it even sadder because he was always portraying funny characters with so much wit and happiness yet he is so sad that he would take his own life. People glamorize Hollywood lifestyles and fame yet it really takes a toll on some of the grandest people to ever walk the earth. He kept his spark of madness right up until the end. The best thing about actors is that they live on through their characters. They never truly leave us.

Genie, you’re free

(via carolanski)

69,753 notes

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

witchlingfumbles:

boazpriestly:

thezulla:

leadingtone:

On the importance of a teddy bear…
(by Begemott)

i will reblog this every time.

But what if the teddy bear is the nightmare and the creature is the protector?

It is a little-known fact that teddy bears crave and feed on the dreams of young children. It is little-known, of course, because the bears are so soft and cuddly that they convince the young children that they need them. For a while, the bear will feed on the bad dreams, leaving the child with nothing but the sweetest of dreams. But the good dreams taste better and feed them more, so eventually the teddy bear will start feeding on those, and the child will have nightmares every night. And, because the teddy bear so thoroughly convinces the child that the bear is necessary for the good dreams, they will keep sleeping with it, hoping for its magic to work again.
But the mind of a child is so rich and imaginative that it creates the means to its salvation. The monster under the bed rises, in the end, to vanquish the bear. Some nights it rises before the first nightmare night. Other times, it is at the last moment, and rises only when the bear means to suck dry every last dream and imagination in the child’s mind.
Tonight is the former. This monster was sent out in time to save its child from a single bad dream. And despite the teddy bear’s sword, the monster is fierce and devours it in a single gulp.
It is about to leave when it hears confused, wordless mumbles. The monster looks down and sees its child is awake, and looking up at it. Sleep has not faded so much that the child doesn’t scream, just asks in a sweet voice what the monster is doing there.
The monster, like the teddy bear, can’t speak. Instead it picks up the water by the bedside, hands its child the glass. Still confused, the child takes it. When the child drinks its fill and hands it back, the monster tucks it in with gentle claws.
The child murmurs a thanks and falls asleep again. And the monster leaves, satisfied that it has left its child with less fear rather than more.

holy shit that was beautiful

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

witchlingfumbles:

boazpriestly:

thezulla:

leadingtone:

On the importance of a teddy bear…

(by Begemott)

i will reblog this every time.

But what if the teddy bear is the nightmare and the creature is the protector?

It is a little-known fact that teddy bears crave and feed on the dreams of young children. It is little-known, of course, because the bears are so soft and cuddly that they convince the young children that they need them. For a while, the bear will feed on the bad dreams, leaving the child with nothing but the sweetest of dreams. But the good dreams taste better and feed them more, so eventually the teddy bear will start feeding on those, and the child will have nightmares every night. And, because the teddy bear so thoroughly convinces the child that the bear is necessary for the good dreams, they will keep sleeping with it, hoping for its magic to work again.

But the mind of a child is so rich and imaginative that it creates the means to its salvation. The monster under the bed rises, in the end, to vanquish the bear. Some nights it rises before the first nightmare night. Other times, it is at the last moment, and rises only when the bear means to suck dry every last dream and imagination in the child’s mind.

Tonight is the former. This monster was sent out in time to save its child from a single bad dream. And despite the teddy bear’s sword, the monster is fierce and devours it in a single gulp.

It is about to leave when it hears confused, wordless mumbles. The monster looks down and sees its child is awake, and looking up at it. Sleep has not faded so much that the child doesn’t scream, just asks in a sweet voice what the monster is doing there.

The monster, like the teddy bear, can’t speak. Instead it picks up the water by the bedside, hands its child the glass. Still confused, the child takes it. When the child drinks its fill and hands it back, the monster tucks it in with gentle claws.

The child murmurs a thanks and falls asleep again. And the monster leaves, satisfied that it has left its child with less fear rather than more.

holy shit that was beautiful

(via carolanski)